Alex Seton Wins Sovereign Asian Art Prize With Marble Boat Engine – Ocula Magazine

Seton said he was proud to show alongside other artists from the region, ‘where all the most exciting art is being made now’.

Alex Seton, Oilstone 05_Corrosion (2019). Courtesy the artist and Sovereign Art Foundation. Image: Mark Pokorny.

Australian artist Alex Seton won this year’s Sovereign Asian Art Prize with a Yamaha boat engine recreated in marble. He receives US $30,000 in acknowledgement of the work, entitled Oilstone 05_Corrosion (2019).

Two more prizewinners were announced alongside Seton. Pakistani artist Saba Qizilbash was awarded The Vogue Hong Kong Women’s Art Prize of $5,000 for her work Inbezelment (2019), an installation of graphite drawings on mylar paper, and Indonesian artist Made Wiguna Valasara won the Public Vote Prize of $1,000 for her work Daily Parade (2019), a hand-stitched, embossed canvas evocative of traditional Balinese painting.

In his practice, Seton adopts materials and techniques used in classical statuary to bring out the beauty in banal contemporary objects. To create Oilstone 05_Corrosion, he took 200-million-year-old stone and smashed it, reassembled it, and weathered it with hydrochloric acid to give it the appearance of an ancient relic.

Seton was nominated for the prize by Dr Mikala Tai, Director of 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art in Sydney.

‘Without curator advocates like Mikala it’s almost impossible to stand out in the wonderful roar of contemporary art now,’ Seton said. ‘This year’s field of artists have my admiration and heartfelt congratulations for their bold and sensitive works, and I’m proud to show alongside them together as artists of the Asia-Pacific region. It is after all, where all the most exciting art is being made now.’

Altogether, Mikala and 87 other art professionals nominated 611 mid-career artists from 26 countries and territories for the prize. That number was whittled down to a shortlist of 31 by a judging panel comprising: museum director David Elliott, Financial Times arts editor Jan Dalley, art historian Jiyoon Lee, and artists Miao Xiaochun and Zhou Li. The shortlisted artists took part in the Finalists Exhibition at K11 HACC, from June 6–July 19, where Hong Kong-based judges architect William Lim, Asia Society’s Alice Mong, and Asia Art Archive’s Elaine Lin added their scores before a winner was chosen.

The Sovereign Asian Art Prize was established in 2003 by the Sovereign Art Foundation, a charitable organisation that aims to draw attention to art talent in Asia and use the arts to benefit disadvantaged children. All the shortlisted artworks, other than Seton’s, will be auctioned online at saapauction.com, with proceeds split evenly between the artists and the foundation’s charitable projects. —[O]

Alex Seton Wins Sovereign Asia Art Prize With Marble Boat Engine – Ocula Magazine

Seton said he was proud to show alongside other artists from the region, ‘where all the most exciting art is being made now’.

Alex Seton, Oilstone 05_Corrosion (2019). Courtesy the artist and Sovereign Art Foundation. Image: Mark Pokorny.

Australian artist Alex Seton won this year’s Sovereign Asia Art Prize with a Yamaha boat engine recreated in marble. He receives US $30,000 in acknowledgement of the work, entitled Oilstone 05_Corrosion (2019).

Two more prizewinners were announced alongside Seton. Pakistani artist Saba Qizilbash was awarded The Vogue Hong Kong Women’s Art Prize of $5,000 for her work Inbezelment (2019), an installation of graphite drawings on mylar paper, and Indonesian artist Made Wiguna Valasara won the Public Vote Prize of $1,000 for her work Daily Parade (2019), a hand-stitched, embossed canvas evocative of traditional Balinese painting.

In his practice, Seton adopts materials and techniques used in classical statuary to bring out the beauty in banal contemporary objects. To create Oilstone 05_Corrosion, he took 200-million-year-old stone and smashed it, reassembled it, and weathered it with hydrochloric acid to give it the appearance of an ancient relic.

Seton was nominated for the prize by Dr Mikala Tai, Director of 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art in Sydney.

‘Without curator advocates like Mikala it’s almost impossible to stand out in the wonderful roar of contemporary art now,’ Seton said. ‘This year’s field of artists have my admiration and heartfelt congratulations for their bold and sensitive works, and I’m proud to show alongside them together as artists of the Asia-Pacific region. It is after all, where all the most exciting art is being made now.’

Altogether, Mikala and 87 other art professionals nominated 611 mid-career artists from 26 countries and territories for the prize. That number was whittled down to a shortlist of 31 by a judging panel comprising: museum director David Elliott, Financial Times arts editor Jan Dalley, art historian Jiyoon Lee, and artists Miao Xiaochun and Zhou Li. The shortlisted artists took part in the Finalists Exhibition at K11 HACC, from June 6–July 19, where Hong Kong-based judges architect William Lim, Asia Society’s Alice Mong, and Asia Art Archive’s Elaine Lin added their scores before a winner was chosen.

The Sovereign Art Prize was established in 2003 by the Sovereign Art Foundation, a charitable organisation that aims to draw attention to art talent in Asia and use the arts to benefit disadvantaged children. All the shortlisted artworks, other than Seton’s, will be auctioned online at saapauction.com, with proceeds split evenly between the artists and the foundation’s charitable projects. —[O]

Heartbreaking moment family breaks down over the death of 17-year-old boy killed in crash – Daily Mail


‘Such a waste’: Heartbroken family burst into tears as they open up on the death of 17-year-old boy car passenger killed on a night out with friends

  • Family of teen killed in horror smash break down opening up on tragedy 
  • Barney Wakes-Miller, 17, died when car he was travelling in crashed
  • There were six young people travelling in an overloaded Holden Commodore 
  • NSW Police say no arrests or changes have been made but inquiries are ongoing 

The family of a teenager killed in a horror crash broke down in tears as they opened up about the agony of losing their loved one.   

Barney Wakes-Miller, 17, died when the vehicle he was travelling in came off the road and slammed into a sandstone and wrought iron fence at Elanora Heights on Saturday at about 11.20pm.  

His mother Bella Wakes-Miller described her son’s tragic death as a heartbreaking ‘waste’. 

‘It is just the beginning of a horrible life without Barn … such a waste,’ she told Nine News.

The family of teenager Barney Wakes-Miller, who killed in a horror crash on Saturday, broke down in tears as they spoke about the ‘real treasure’ in their lives

Barney Wakes-Miller, 17, (pictured) died when the vehicle his mate was driving came off the road and slammed into a sandstone and wrought iron fence at Elanora Heights on Saturday 

His father Duncan Wakes-Miller described Barney as the ‘most amazing son that you could ask for’.

‘We miss him like you cannot believe. We really miss him, anyone whose got children hug them tighter tonight,’ he said through tears.  

Barney’s little sister Iona broke down as she described the love she had for her brother. 

‘I think we all know we love our siblings to the core and you don’t want to have to miss them one day,’ she said. 

The family also released a statement after Barney’s death describing how he lived with ‘artistic brilliance’.

‘Barn gave everything he did 110 per cent from his artistic brilliance, that was a constant thread through his life, to his love of his brothers Arthur and Tenzin and his little sister Iona,’ the family said in a statement to the Manly Daily.

Barney had suffered critical head injuries and received treatment from NSW Ambulance crews before he died at the scene (pictured)

‘Barn was our rainbow, a complex mix of light and shade, and we will look for him in the sky when the rain falls and the sun shines.

‘At night, he is the brightest star in the sky. He will always be with us. We love him, and he is part of all that is good, creative and brilliant.’

Barney had suffered critical head injuries in the horror crash and received treatment from NSW Ambulance crews before he died at the scene.

Police said he was travelling in an overloaded Holden Commodore with one female and four male teenagers at the time of the accident.

The four surviving passengers and 17-year-old driver on his red p-plates were taken to Royal North Hospital for precautionary checks.

The driver also underwent a blood and urine test for drugs and alcohol.

NSW Police told Daily Mail Australia in a statement on Monday that no charges or arrests have been made at this stage, but ‘investigations are continuing into the circumstances surrounding the crash.’

Tributes poured in for the Sydney teenager (pictured) who was described as artistically brilliant

Northern Beaches Police Commander Pat Sharkey said the tragedy had taken a heavy huge toll on the local community.

‘Everyone in this incidence, the people in the vehicle and their families, are all quite traumatised by this,’ he said on Sunday.

‘All six occupants in the vehicle are northern beaches locals.’

Barney was the second eldest of four other siblings and was so skilled as an illustrator he won his school’s art prize at St Augustine’s College in Brookvale four years in a row.

Friends, family and members of the local community have placed flowers at the scene of the horror smash.

Police have urged witnesses or anyone with information on the crash to come forward.

‘Barn was our rainbow, a complex mix of light and shade, and we will look for him in the sky when the rain falls and the sun shines,’ his family said.

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Family’s heartbreak after ‘adored’ son, 17, was killed when his P-plate mate drove into a fence – Daily Mail


‘Barney was our rainbow’: Family’s heartbreak after their son, 17, died in a horror car crash – as police continue investigation into what caused P-plate driver to veer into a fence

  • Family of young man tragically killed in horror smash pay tribute to ‘adored’ teen
  • Barney Wakes-Miller, 17, died when the vehicle his mate was driving crashed
  • There were six young people travelling in an overloaded Holden Commodore 
  • NSW Police say no arrests or changes have been made but inquiries are ongoing 

Tributes have poured in for an ‘adored’ teenager who was tragically killed in a horror car crash on Sydney’s northern beaches.

Barney Wakes-Miller, 17, died when the vehicle his mate was driving came off the road and slammed into a sandstone and wrought iron fence at Elanora Heights on Saturday at about 11.20pm.

Family of the young man said he was their ‘rainbow’ and a ‘real treasure’ in their lives.

Tributes have poured in for Barney Wakes-Miller (pictured) who was tragically killed in car crash on Sydney’s northern beaches 

‘Barn gave everything he did 110 per cent from his artistic brilliance, that was a constant thread through his life, to his love of his brothers Arthur and Tenzin and his little sister Iona,’ the family said in a statement to the Manly Daily.

‘Barn was our rainbow, a complex mix of light and shade, and we will look for him in the sky when the rain falls and the sun shines.

‘At night, he is the brightest star in the sky. He will always be with us. We love him, and he is part of all that is good, creative and brilliant.’

Barney had suffered critical head injuries and received treatment from NSW Ambulance crews before he died at the scene.

The 17-year-old died when the vehicle his mate was driving came off the road and slammed into a sandstone fence and wrought iron at Elanora Heights on Saturday at about 11.20pm

A police officer is pictured examining the crash site where Barney was tragically killed

The overloaded Holden Commodore slammed into the fence (pictured) which was made of sandstone and wrought iron

Police said he was travelling in an overloaded Holden Commodore with one female and four male teenagers at the time of the accident.

The four surviving passengers and 17-year-old driver on his red p-plates were taken to Royal North Hospital for precautionary checks.

The driver also underwent a blood and urine test for drugs and alcohol.

NSW Police told Daily Mail in a statement on Monday that no charges or arrests have been made at this stage, but ‘investigations are continuing into the circumstances surrounding the crash.’

Northern Beaches Police Commander Pat Sharkey said the tragedy had taken a heavy huge toll on the local community.

‘Everyone in this incidence, the people in the vehicle and their families, are all quite traumatised by this,’ he said on Sunday.

‘All six occupants in the vehicle are northern beaches locals.’

Barney was the second eldest of four other siblings and was so skilled as an illustrator he won his school’s art prize at St Augustine’s College in Brookvale four years in a row.

Friends, family and members of the local community have placed flowers at the scene of the horror smash.

Police have urged witnesses or anyone with information on the crash to come forward.

‘Barn was our rainbow, a complex mix of light and shade, and we will look for him in the sky when the rain falls and the sun shines,’ his family said.

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Coast lawyer’s 30-year career recognised – Sunshine Coast Daily

A Coast lawyer humbled with being named as a finalist in the LawyersWeekly Australian Law Awards 2020 said his job has allowed him to live by the “ethos of giving back”.

The founder of Argon Law John Gallagher has more than 30 years’ experience in commercial and property law as well as wills and estate planning and is motivated by helping clients to achieve best possible outcomes.

Charity co-founder honoured for lifesaving work

Good Bar chef ends 30 year career to start fresh

Mr Gallagher said he was humbled to be recognised and proud to be named as a finalist in the Australian Law Awards 2020.

“I truly have the privilege of working with an incredible team at Argon Law and I thank each and every one of my team for their incredible part in making Argon Law the firm it is,” he said.

“I live by the ethos of giving back and the success of Argon Law has meant that I can continue to contribute to the community through sponsorship of the Buderim9 Challenge Ride and the Sunshine Coast Art Prize.”

The Australian Law Awards recognise excellence across the legal profession and showcase professional development and innovation, celebrating those that are leading the way in the industry.

The Australia-wide search features over 320 high-achieving finalists in the legal profession across 34 submission-based categories.

“It is our pleasure to mark the 20th year anniversary of the Australian Law Awards,” LawyersWeekly editor Emma Ryan said.

“This annual event represents the premier benchmark for those operating in the business of law, covering vast practice areas, level of experience and contribution to the profession.”

The awards ceremony will be broadcast live this year and will be held on August 7.

Beer lovers from near and far enjoyed a nice drop, or two at the grand opening of the Coast’s newest brewery. PHOTO GALLERY INSIDE

The jockey to watch was particularly thrilled to savour the biggest win of his career with another upcoming Queensland hoop.

Health authorities are concerned people in NSW are becoming ‘complacent’ about social distancing as COVID-19 cases rose by 15 overnight.

Two children, aged under two, have been rushed to hospital in a critical condition after a near drowning in a backyard swimming pool at a home

Has a high-ranking IOC appointment put Brisbane and her firmly back in the big picture for the 2032 Olympics?

The last thing feminism needs right now is yet another high profile woman using the movement for personal promotion. We’ve been through this before with Clinton

Upcoming lucrative art prizes and residencies you need to know about – ArtsHub

With hundreds of art prizes, awards and residencies in Australia, knowing the ones to choose isn’t easy when it comes to positioning your artwork. Here are some of the most lucrative in Australia:

CLOSES: 27 SEPTEMBER

A National acquisitive landscape prize with $30,000 awarded annually for a painting inspired by the Australian landscape. Plus, six non-acquisitive prizes on offer including the Defiance Gallery Award, which includes an exhibition in Sydney and the Nock Foundation residency in New Zealand.


Georges River Artist in Residence
CLOSES: 23 AUGUST

The Georges River Artist in Residence program offers artists a unique location to explore their artistic practice. Residencies of up to three months are available and include a studio space and accommodation. Australian and international artists are encouraged to apply.


Dobell Drawing Prize #22
CLOSES: 5 OCTOBER

Dobell Drawing Prize #22 is the leading drawing exhibition in Australia and an unparalleled celebration of drawing innovation. Presented by NAS and Sir William Dobell Art Foundation, this biennial, $30,000 acquisitive prize explores the importance of drawing within contemporary practice.


CLOSES: 10 AUGUST

This national acquisitive painting prize is valued at $50,000 with an additional four awards on offer. The 2020 Prize judge is Alexie Glass-Kantor, Executive Director, Artspace, Sydney. Receipting day will be held on Monday 10 August, 8am-7pm.


Maritime Art Prize
CLOSES: 31 AUGUST

Entries are now open for the Maritime Art Prize and Exhibition. Artists are invited to respond to the theme ‘The Relationship of Humanity to the Sea’ to compete for a share of $20,000 in prizes.


Woollahra Small Sculpture Prize
CLOSES: 31 JULY

An acquisitive award for an original sculpture of up to 80cm in any dimension, open to all artists both emerging through to established. Prizes across four categories now increased to $29,000 to celebrate 20 years in 2020.


CLOSES: 12 OCTOBER

One of Australia’s longest-standing and most prestigious prizes. Encouraging conversation about belief and non-belief, hope, humanity, social justice, religion and spirituality through art. Casula Powerhouse Arts Centre manages this bi-annual event with a prize pool of over $41,000.


CLOSES: 2 SEPTEMBER
The Fisher’s Ghost Art Award is an annual art prize inviting artists to submit works in a variety of artistic categories and mediums. Now in its 58th year, with a total of $36,000 in prizes, including the Open section which is acquisitive to the Campbelltown City Council collection,  valued at $25,000

CLOSES: 31 JULY
The Paul Guest Prize is a non-acquisitive cash award of $15,000 and exhibition held biennially that highlights contemporary drawing practice in Australia. The Prize was initiated by former Family Court Judge and Olympic rower, The Honourable Paul Guest OAM QC.

Where the streets have Greek names… and plaques and memorials – Neos Kosmos


“This City is what it is because our citizens are what they are.”

Australia, it is said, is a country of immigrants. It has had hundreds of years of practising migration to get it right.

Unfortunately, Australia has not always got it right. There have been racial atrocities committed against the Indigenous peoples, legislated racism with the White Australia policy and present-day racist attitudes. But, Australia does try to recognise its Indigenous and multicultural heritage and thank its citizens of non-English speaking background for their influences and achievements.

Below is a small list of the statues, monuments, plaques, parks, and street and suburb names, honouring Hellenism and notable Greeks and Greek-Cypriots who settled in all six Australian states and its two territories during more than 200 years of migration.

That recognition ranges from statues honouring mythical ancient Greeks like the goddess Athena, in Sydney, who surveys over Barracks St. To the Western Australian suburb of Prevelly, dedicated to the Monastery of Prevelli, in Crete, that saved a World War II Australian soldier’s life. To a busk of a Greek priest, Rev. Father Nicholas Moutafis, in a Melbourne suburban park with an Indigenous name where a monument dedicated to fallen soldiers also stands.

They show, as Plato would argue, citizens fashioning their cities and, in turn, cities and towns reflecting its citizens.

VICTORIA

Collingwood

Theo Sidiropoulos was born in Katerini, Greece, and migrated to Australia in 1954. He was the first Greek-born person to be elected to Victorian Parliament, but he also formed part of the resistance in Greece, and in Australia was Collingwood City mayor and an advocate for social justice and migrant rights. It is perhaps this advocacy that framed the unique and large memorial to him.

The memorial invites the viewer to “Stand Up – Speak Out” and is symbolic of a speaker’s mound, “a place where all people can have their say and be heard”, the inscription states. It includes a picture of Mr Sidiropoulos waving, words in different languages, including the Greek word for freedom and a backgammon motif. The memorial is in front of three olive trees and a fig tree in the adjoining St Philip’s Anglican Church.

For further information on Mr Sidiropoulos’s life go to www.parliament.vic.com.au or visit the memorial at the former Collingwood Town Hall garden, corner of Hoddle and Stanton streets, Collingwood.

Oakleigh

The late Reverend Father Nicholas Moutafis was the priest at one of Melbourne’s most- frequented Greek Orthodox churches for so long, that many children of post World War II immigrant parents have photos of being baptised by him, their parents becoming godparents at his church and they, themselves, being married by him.

Father Moutafis was the priest at, Sts Anagyri, in Willesden Rd, Oakleigh, from 1964 to 2001. A relentless advocate for Hellenism and Greek Orthodoxy, he helped establish and develop the Sts Anagyri church, the adjoining elderly citizens units, Oakleigh Greek Orthodox Community Centre, and Sts Anagyri college, which is now Oakleigh Grammar, and its sports complex.

In recognition of these achievements, a bust of Fr Moutafis was erected in Warrawee Park in 2003. “Warrawee” is an Indigenous word meaning “stop here” . The bust is 58 steps from the monument dedicated to the soldiers of all wars waged in the 20th century and 25 steps from the manzanilla olive tree gifted to the city from the Beirut Hellenic Bank, Oakleigh branch. The non-profit organisation, Monument Australia, stated that: “This memorial set a precedent for recognising community figures”. (See pic 1)

Thousands attended Fr Moutafis’s funeral, at the Oakleigh church, on Tuesday 26 June 2001, at 11am. In fact, there were so many mourners, that Melbourne ABC radio 774 Breakfast show gave a traffic report advising listeners of the congestion.

For further information go to descendant Tim Moutafis’s website www.frmoutafis.com and his YouTube video, “Fr. Nicholas Moutafis Funeral 2001”;  www.oakleighgrammar.vic.edu.au; or visit Warrawee Park, corner Drummond St and Atherton Rd, Oakleigh, across the road from Melbourne’s famous Hellenic precinct, in Eaton Mall.

Father Nicholas Moutafis. Photo: Monuments Australia

Brunswick

The great hero Leonidas is honoured at Sparta Place, Brunswick.

READ MORE: When ancient Greek statues speak

NSW

Sydney

One of the first prominent Greek settlers of rural NSW was Konstantinos Argyropoulos who became a profitable landowner, in Parkes. He arrived in Sydney in 1854 and changed his name to Constantine Fisher. There is also the story of the seven Greek sailors convicted of piracy in 1828 and sent as convicts to New South Wales, in 1829.

High-achieving Greeks of NSW are too many to mention: their honours in the habour side city too many to list.

But, just as important is Sydney’s homage to ancient Greek civilisation with its statues of the gods Athena and Apollo.

The Athena statue, in Barrack St, Sydney, is a copy of a 4th century BC bronze statue of the Greek goddess attributed to the ancient Greek sculptor, Kephisodotos. The Mayor of Athens gifted the statue to the city for the 2000 Sydney Olympic Games.

One of Sydney’s most photographed sites, a statue of the god Apollo, was unveiled in 1932 and stands in the northern side of Hyde Park. “Apollo” at the Archibald Fountain features a bronze Apollo surrounded by other mythical figures. It was bequeathed to the city by the creator of Australia’s leading portrait art prize, The Archibald Prize, and founder of the Bulletin magazine, John Feltham Archibald.

For further information on Hyde Park, go to www.cityofsydney.nsw.gov.au. For further information on Greeks in NSW go to www.environment.nsw.gov.au and then Craig Turnball and Chris Valiotis, Beyond the Rolling Wave – A Thematic History of Greek Settlement in New South Wales (2001).

READ MORE: Photo of the Week: Lemona, the refugee girl, embraced by the locals

QUEENSLAND

Blackall

The Central Café, in Blackall, Queensland was so special, the Blackall Shire Council has a plaque commemorating it.

Central Café was everything – a café, newsagency, confectionary, book seller and tobacconist. It was opened by the Cominos family in the early 1920s then bought by the Logothelis (Logos) Brothers.

The plaque honouring it states: “A visit to the café was a social highlight with its silver table settings, printed menus and waitresses in starched green uniforms.” The café closed after 70 years, in the 1990s.

For more information on the pioneering Greek families who ran the café go to www.kythera-family.net, Nick Politis, Architecture.

Blackall Cafe

South Brisbane

Hector Vasyli was the son of a Cypriot-born father. His parents ran the then Queensland Oyster Palace, in South Brisbane, a short distance from the then Victoria Bridge. Like many, this 11-year-old would go to the bridge to welcome home World War I returned soldiers. It is written, that he would save up his pocket money to buy gifts, like flowers and cigarettes, and through them at returning soldiers as they walked by. Hector was hit by a vehicle in the military procession as it swerved to avoid hitting another car in the procession. He died in June 1918.

The memorial honouring him is at the former Victoria Bridge abutment, at 74 Stanley St. The abutment became a World War I memorial because of Hector’s death. The memorial has a metal bust of Hector and is a tribute to a boy who was patriotic to Australia and who, the inscription states, “in his veins ran the heroic blood of Greece, and in the breast of a child he carried the heart of a man.” The actual bridge was pulled down in 1969.

For further information, visit www.visitbrisbane.com.au/en

READ MORE: Melbourne artist honours patriotic Cypriot-Australian boy 100 years on

A memorial located at the southern end of Victoria Bridge in Brisbane, honours Hector Vasyli. Photo: Lest We Forget/ Graeme Watson

SOUTH AUSTRALIA

Elliston

Georgios Tramountanas is generally credited as being the first Greek to settle in South Australia, in 1842. His surname in Greek means “northern wind” so he changed it to North. He is recognised with a plaque in Elliston headed in Greek and English with the words: “Πάροδος Γιώργος Τραμουντάνας, George North Walkway.”

The Greek Orthodox Community, of South Australia, has also installed a memorial stone at his gravesite and local North descendants have planted an olive grove leading to the grave.

For further information, head to the Tramountanas-North Association.

Pt Willunga and Lewiston

There are also interesting Greek street names in SA, like the Star of Greece Rd, in Pt Willunga, which is opposite Gulf St Vincent and Voula Ct, in Lewiston. For more SA streets with Greek names go to UBD Gregory’s Street Directory Adelaide and Surrounds (2018).

NORTHERN TERRITORY

Darwin

Nicholas Liveris Walk, Darwin City, was registered on 3 February, this year. This milestone was 104 years after Mr Liveris’s birth in Kastellorizo on 28 February 1916.

His parents Andreas and Maria Liveris are considered pioneers of Darwin and helped build pre-Cyclone Tracy Darwin. Cyclone Tracy was in 1974. The Maria Liveris Dr, is in The Gardens, near Fannie Bay.

Nicholas Liveris became the head of the family at 10 years old, when his father died, working to help his two brothers, Lazarus (Les) and George finish school. He started the company Progressive Builders, and built such iconic pre-Tracy Darwin structures as the first courthouse and parliament house, and the Uniting Church, in Smith St. His brother, Les Liveris, had an illustrious career, including becoming NT Immigration Minister.

For further information on the walk’s history and location, go to the NT government’s place names register extract at, www.ntlis.nt.gov.au/placenames/ .

Wanguri, Coolalinga and Larrakeyah

There are many streets in the NT named after pioneering Greek families . Paspaley Pl, in Larrakeyah, is right on the marina and named after the world-renown Paspaley pearlers. Patsalou Rd, in Coolalinga, is named after the Greek-Cypriot family who were famous poultry, fruit and vegetable producers who supplied their goods to distinguished organisations and people, including the Defence Department and the Royal Yacht, in 1962.

In the suburb of Wanguri, there is, in a row, Margaritis St, Kailis St and Kailis Park, Canaris St, Haritos St and Haritos Park, Taifalos St, Dioctitis St and Harmanis St and Harmanis Park.

For a history of pioneering Greek and Greek-Cypriot families read the NT’s seventeenth administrator, John Anictomatis’s, Eric Johnston Lecture, at www.ntl.nt.gov.au/eric-johnston-lecture , “A Home Away from Home – the Aegean to Australia”, (2000). For Greek street names go online or to UBD Gregory’s Street Directory Darwin and Central Australia, (2017), p18. Also visit the NT government’s online place name register listed above.

WESTERN AUSTRALIA

Prevelly

So grateful was World War II soldier, Geoff Edwards OAM, to the people of Crete for helping him avoid capture, he subdivided and named this coastal townsite on the southern tip of Western Australia, Prevelly. Prevelly is 287km south-west of Perth and 9km west of Margaret River.

Prevelly is dedicated to the Monastery of Prevelli, in Crete, who haboured and helped Australian soldiers, like Mr Edwards, escape. He also built St John the Theologian Greek Orthodox Church, in Wallcliffe Rd, above his seaside community.

Several streets in Prevelly, like Vatos Way and Papadakis Rd, are named after the monks and families who helped him survive in Crete.

For further information go to www.reiwa.com and www.anzacsofgreece.org/en/milestones.

ACT

Curtin

Many prominent Canberrans of Greek heritage have been lauded and awarded. But, there are other less well known Canberrans.

Vince and Viola Kalokerinos’ milk bar and its pizzas were an institution, in Curtin, and a plaque in the Curtin shops square, at 26 Curtin Pl, Curtin, commemorates Vince’s contribution to the community. It reads: “Vince Kalokerinos, The people of Curtin and District wish to say thank you Vince for services to our community.”

For further information on Vince Kalokerinos go to his son’s work, John Kalokerinos, From Kythera to Canberra: Vince and Viola Kalokerinos: A migration study (online), Australian Journal of Biography and History, (2019); and the Canberra and District Historical Society’s website www.canberrahistory.org.au/CurtinLivingMemories , Ann Smith interviewer (26 Feb 2015.)

Bonner

Jackomos St, is named after Melbourne –based Aboriginal activist, Alick Jackomos, and is in the suburb of Bonner, which is named after Australia’s first Indigenous parliamentarian, Senator Neville Bonner. Alick Jackomos had Kastellorizian heritage.

For further information on Alick Jackomos go to the National Museum Australia website www.nma.gov.au or Richard Broome and Corinne Manning, A Man of All Tribes: The Life of Alick Jackomos, Aboriginal Studies Press, Canberra, (2006). For further information on street names in Canberra download the app at www.actmapi.act.gov.au

TASMANIA

Tasmania has a rich history of Greek migration dating back to the late 1800s.

Trifon Kelestioglou, of Tyrnavos, Greece, is said to be the earliest Greek to settle in Tasmania. He came in 1875. He adopted the name George Nicholls and traded in Hobart as a licensed victualler.

Sir John Demetrius Morris was the highest achiever of Greek background. His grandfather’s surname was Moros, but he changed it to Morris. When John Demetrius Morris was appointed Tasmania’s chief justice in 1940 , he became the first Hellenic Australian chief justice.

But there are many lesser-known worthy figures.

Whitemark

Greek businessman Jimmy Xypteras has a memorial plaque next to a playground, in James St, Whitemark. The inscription states: “This playground equipment has been donated to Flinders Council in memory of Jimmy Xypteras in recognition of his outstanding contributions to the Flinders Island Community November 2011.”

For further information go to www.kythera-family.net, George Poulos, Greeks in Tasmania – Kytherians in Tasmania, (2004); www.liv.asn.au, Justice Emilios Kyrou, What’s in a name, (2016); and www.monumentaustralia.org.au.

Fun for the whole family – Whyalla News

If you’re looking for something to do over the July school holidays, then Whyalla is the place to be!

We’re right in the middle of Cuttlefest 2020, which means there’s some great family-friendly activities happening around the city:

  • The Cuttlefish Art Prize competition is open to all ages.
  • You could take the plunge and go snorkelling to see these wonderful creatures in their underwater playground.
  • Join a workshop and make an underwater cuttlefish lantern.
  • Enjoy a local park and play hide and seek with our cuttle-rocks hidden around Whyalla.

Find these and more exciting activities via our website www.whyalla.com.

The Whyalla Maritime Museum and Whyalla Public Library have also geared up for some school holiday fun.

After the success of National Simultaneous Story Time, held online for the first time this year, library staff have continued mixing things up by planning some online school holiday sessions.

These online sessions have been crafted so that children can enjoy some creative fun at home with their families.

The first video of Chris and Ali reading ‘A Sea in my Bedroom’ and then creating a cuttlefish and sock octopus went live on Council’s Facebook page last week.

There’s more to come, so keep an eye on Council’s Facebook page for a new video to drop each Wednesday and Friday during the school holidays.

In order to make the most of these online activities, children will need:

  • Adult supervision
  • Scissors
  • Glue
  • Sticky/masking tape
  • Wild bird seed
  • Markers
  • Twigs/thin sticks
  • Paper towel
  • And a sense of fun and adventure!

The Whyalla Maritime Museum is holding “Cuttlefish Capers” during these July school holidays.

With free entry to the Maritime Museum for children in family groups, Cuttlefish Capers is a fun fact-finding and decoding mission – should you choose to accept.

Pick up your information sheet and decoding key from the friendly staff at the Visitor Centre and let the adventure begin, find as many cuttlefish as you can and learn about the unique and amazing Sepia Apama (Giant Australian Cuttlefish).

Every child will come away with their own certificate and an activity pack so they can make their own cuttle-rock at home.

The Maritime Museum is open 10am to 4pm every day, please note that due to covid-19 there is no access to the ship.

For more information about these fun school holiday activities, please contact:

Whyalla Visitor Centre

P: 8645 7900

E: Visitor.centre@whyalla.sa.gov.au

Whyalla Public Library

P: 8645 7891

E: library@whyalla.sa.gov.au

National art prize entries closing tomorrow – Mirage News

With more than $40,000 in cash and prizes on offer, artists from across the country are encouraged to get their entries in for the Sunshine Coast Art Prize 2020, before submissions close tomorrow.

Don’t miss this one-time opportunity to be a part of the Sunshine Coast Art Prize 2020, in this milestone year the Caloundra Regional Gallery’s 20th anniversary.

To celebrate the anniversary and support artists during one of the most unprecedented periods due to the COVID-19 impact, entry is free. Artists can enter online via the gallery website.

The art prize is one of the most prestigious regional 2D art prizes in Australia and offers a major acquisitive cash prize of $25,000 sponsored by Argon Law and Sunshine Coast Council.

Finalists will be announced in August and their work will be showcased in an exhibition both at the Caloundra Regional Gallery and online from Friday, October 16 to Sunday, December 6.

High profile gallery director Tracy Cooper-Lavery, who has worked in the regional art museum sector for more than 20 years, will have the enviable task of selecting this year’s winners.

Winners will be announced on December 3.

Prize details

  • Major prize: an acquisitive prize of $25,000 cash sponsored by Argon Law and Sunshine Coast Council
  • Highly Commended: non-acquisitive prize of $5000 sponsored by the De Deyne family
  • People’s Choice: non-acquisitive prize of $2500 sponsored by Caloundra Chamber of Commerce
  • Sunshine Coast Art Prize Residency: sponsored by Caloundra Regional Gallery and Montville Country Cabins.

Artwork transportation costs have been covered thanks to IAS Fine Art Logistics and Caloundra Regional Gallery.

The winning work will be acquired into the Sunshine Coast Art Collection.

Entry is open to any Australian resident.

For more details, including terms and conditions of entry, visit the Caloundra Regional Gallery website.

Image: Jandamarra Cadd, Cleverman, 2017. Winner 2019 Sunshine Coast Art Prize People’s Choice Award. Photo ben vos productions. Jandamarra with Uncle Jack Charles.

/Public Release. View in full here.

ARTEFACTS: Last chance to view two vibrant exhibitions – Daily Examiner

From the collection

Ken Smith
A truck crossing a bridge by the sea
Graphite on paper
22 x 76cm
Acquired from the 2008 JADA

Ken Smith’s drawing ‘A truck crossing a bridge by the sea’ was acquired from the 2008 Jacaranda Acquisitive Drawing Award, and became part of the gallery’s collection of contemporary Australian drawings. Ken’s drawings have featured in the JADA exhibitions many times; he was a finalist in 2000, 2002, 2004 and again in 2008 when he was acquired.

Born in Melbourne in 1951, Ken studied at the Victorian College of the Arts form where he obtained undergraduate and postgraduate awards; he also has a Master of Arts from Monash University. Since graduating Ken has created imagery with drawing, painting and printmaking processes, has held fourteen solo exhibitions and been included in many group exhibitions. Ken has also had research papers published in international journals and forums.

 

Ken Smith, A truck crossing a bridge by the sea

 

The sustaining stimulus for all this investigative activity has been the phenomena of light as the revelatory agent for the forms, spaces, colours and atmospheres of the visible world.

In 2014 Ken concluded a long career as a Lecturer in Drawing within the Faculty of Art, Design and Architecture at Monash University, subsequently completing residencies both nationally and internationally and has works in private collections around the world.

 

Artefacts

This week is your last chance to view two vibrant and uplifting exhibitions, ‘Soul Ties’ by Kade Valja and ‘Young at Heart’ by Sue Bell.

In Soul Ties Kade explores and documents spiritual lessons and life experiences from a human standpoint. Kade describes his exhibition as “I have approached creating the work for this exhibition in a very different way to any of my previous shows, by exploring and delving into the life experiences that touch humans on a deeper level than physicality and flesh, namely the soul.”

Kade Valja, It gets late so early now

Memories from childhood are the inspiration for Sue bell in her exhibition ‘Young at heart’. Sue describes the themes of her exhibition as ‘Memories gather like cobwebs over the years and slowly emerge at odd moments. My baby shoes, which my mother carried around lovingly for many years are a trigger for many images. This complex mix of imagery is put together like a scattered narrative in a dream.”

The deadline for JADA has been extended to July 19, so now is the time to get your drawings in to be part of this well-known art prize. Visit the Gallery website for more information.

 

Sue Bell, Divine Seahorse

 

 

Opportunities

 

Call out for designs by Clarence Valley Artists

As part of the new Grafton Regional Gallery development there are a number of opportunities for local artist to develop designs that will be incorporated into a number of building elements within the Gallery precinct. We are inviting artists to register their interest. To find out more please email the Gallery at gallery@clarence.nsw.gov.au by Friday 17 July.

 

Art Road Trips

Winter is a great time to take an art road trip. This week we look at what’s on at Tweed Regional Gallery

 

Double Vision: Euan Macleod and Ron McBurnie

On display until November 15

In early 2020, artists Euan Macleod and Ron McBurnie spent time in the Gallery’s Nancy Fairfax Artist in Residency Studio. During their residency, the artists worked en plein air both on the Gallery grounds and across the surrounding region. The aim of this residency was to develop a body of work for an exhibition in the Friends Gallery in March 2020.

 

Margaret Olley: Inspired

On display until October 18

Margaret Olley was inspired by her extraordinary home studio for nearly fifty years. It was an ecosystem of art and life. She painted its interiors in changing light, as well as still life subjects selected from the collections of ‘things’ that filled each and every room.

During her lifetime, Olley and her home studio also inspired other artists – they painted and photographed her portrait, as well as her home studio. This remarkable space, in the form of the re-creation at the Margaret Olley Art Centre, continues to inspire artists who undertake residencies in the Gallery’s Nancy Fairfax Artist in Residence Studio.

This exhibition, drawn entirely from the Tweed Regional Gallery collection, includes interior and still life paintings by Olley, portraits of the artist and responses to her home studio by contemporary artists.